« New Yorker Review, etc | Main | Long Tail book party/concert in NYC »

July 04, 2006

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfb6353ef00d8342d962e53ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Music sales falling in the Head, rising in the Tail:

» Il declino dei dischi di successo from Note sui Bit
Il mercato discografico danese ha subito in soli quattro anni una contrazione del 50%, passando dalla cifra record di 20 milioni di vendite nel 2000, ai 9,8 milioni del 2004. Un recente studio del ricercatore danese Claus Pedersen, condotto in collabor... [Read More]

Comments

Jeremy Clark

Chris,

Just FYI: I was listening to a podcast from GMU on Wine and e-Commerce. It was a panel discussion, and an audience member asked specifically about your long tail Wired article and how it relates to the online Wine market. I'm not sure the panel understood the question but you might be interested in their response.

The MP3 is here:
http://tlinscott.cachefly.net/WinePanel.mp3

The question is at 1:04:55

Barry Ritholtz

This is an extremely important finding, and parallels my own research into how the recording industry is declining.

It also provides some insight into how the recording industry can save itself (if only its clever enoguh to do so).


BTW, I am halfway thru the book -- and enjoying it a great deal.

BR

Brugte biler

was a panel discussion, and an audience member asked specifically about your long tail Wired article and how it relates to the online Wine market. It also provides some insight into how the recording industry can save itself (if only its clever enoguh to do so).

eAgent

Hi Chris,

I've been tracking the recording industry, and specifically the condition of declining album (hard media) sales to "soft" media sales and distribution.

I've found that in some ways it very closely parallels software pirating issues in general: People who pirate are often not my clients. Sure, they may use my software (or software in general), but overall, they're not my "customer", because if they were, over time they would purchase.

And guess what? They do. Certainly not all of them, but overall, we get enough people "upgrading" to the paid version, even if they were currently using an unpaid-for pirated and fully-functioning version up to the point of their purchase.

Cool, huh?

Janis Ian has a phenomenal commentary on her web site addressing the very same issue that is certainly worth a read. She happens to believe that pirating of songs via download sites does as much for long-tail dynamics of her catalog than almost any other method. I definitely recommend this article to anyone addressing this issue:

http://www.janisian.com/article-internet_debacle.html

Thanks for the great book, by the way. David McInnis of www.PRWeb.com picked it up and has made the term "Long Tail" a part of the company vernacular. Good stuff.

Best,
Mark Alan Effinger
RichContent.com

Earl Mardle

Just one point about the chart Chris.

The ranges are
>150k
50k-150k
10k-50k

and strangely, <50k

Shouldn't that be <10k?

Otherwise the chart is not a series.

However, thanks for tracing down the hard proof.

Chris Anderson

Earl,

Good catch. I typed a number into Excel wrong. It's now fixed.

Best,

Chris

usb sticks

There is a great fall in music listeners because there is no depth in the music created now a days and it decrease continuously if not improved....

The comments to this entry are closed.

Tidbits

The Long Tail by Chris Anderson

Notes and sources for the book

FREE was available in all digital forms--ebook, web book, and audiobook--for free shortly after the hardcover was published on July 7th. The ebook and web book were free for a limited time and limited to certain geographic regions as determined by each national publisher; the unabridged MP3 audiobook (get zip file here) will remain free forever, available in all regions.

Order the hardcover now!