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October 25, 2006

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tango!

Chris,
thanks for posting up your powerpoint for everyone! I've been wondering where the PopTech webcasts went. Anyhow, will look forward to the end result of this new slide show down the road!

Shaye Horwitz

So now what limits are there left on the entertainment industries? The only one I can think of is time (on the end user's end). How will that shape things?

Irene Grumman

Okay, but...

WIRED has an article in the October issue titled "The Information Factories," which raises questions about where we will get the electricity to keep our information boom going.

Cell phones require a metal found in areas that share habitat with gorillas. Gorillas lose.

We have breath-taking abundance and opportunity, within limits.

gregotheweb

Great stuff.

You do focus on digital products and services. But your thesis can be and has been extended with the possible advent of Fab Labs.

Here is an interesting article in which you are quoted:
http://www.kurzweilai.net/articles/art0671.html?printable=1

Essentially with a personal nanofactory you could create anything within reason. Bringing the economics of abundance directly into real life.

Here is a little more fanciful take on it:
http://www.blog.speculist.com/archives/000256.html

Alex Barnett

thanks for sharing Chris. My thoughts here: http://www.alexbarnett.net/blog/archive/2006/10/26/The-Abundance-of-Memes.aspx (The Abundance of Memes).

John Dumbrille

Irene makes a great point.
We'd love to see what would a world freed from today's content and distribution bottlenecks would look like.
Though you have to wonder how long that world would last - which is probably dependent on what happens to our desire for material abundance.

UniBoy

Software is still a scarce resource. The infrastructure may be nearly free, but processors, memory, storage, bandwidth, etc. do nothing without software.

Mr  lv

Mr.Chris:
I have read your new book--the Long Tail,and I'm also doing researching in internet field in People's Republic of China.However,it is difficult for Chinese to read ,because it is writted by English.So I'm very interesting to be authorized to publish it in the People's Republic of China.
I am a professor,subdecanal of management college in CAS,Chinese Academy of
Sciencer,and I have studied internet economics fou several years.
Because of the lack of your E-mail,If you are interesting in my request,please contact with me.My E-mail is [email protected]!
Best wishes!
Mr.Lv
2006.10.26

Greg Berry

Chris,

Agree with your perspective on abundance, and have been studying the discrepancy between scarcity and abundance in many discrete verticals, as well as in broad memetic views. It's great to see someone of your stature making these key points, at least in terms of digital assets.

My concern / question, though, is one of your attribution to Mayfield "scarcity of attention is false". I read his post, and think this statement may be out of context, but I actually think that human attention is one of the few things that remains scarce (perhaps sufficent), but not really abundant.

You should also look into a book called "The Future of Money" by Bernard Lietaer. In it, he reviews several monetary theories through a lens of scarcity and abundance. This book, and getting to know Lietaer, radically changed my view of what is possible.

Enjoy, and thanks.

-gb

Keith Creed

HIP HOP & THE LONG TAIL...

Its amazing how you're theory is playing out in the field of hip hop. Being as though everyone has access to materials to create records now (PRO TOOLS, CD BURNERS, MYSPACE) the abundance is rendering elaborate marketing campaigns useless forcing small communities to rely on the strongest form of marketing "WORD OF MOUTH". Now regional dominance of a niche sound means so much more, working its way up the long-tail until it becomes the flavor of the month for program directors that scramble to save their positions.

The 'DISTRIBUTION LEVERAGE' has all but disappeared and now the 'small pockets' of creativity; are leading the charge. Leaving many executives scratching their heads in how to regain the dictator status of what's the NEXT BIG THING!

You have written one of the best books for this time, I share the info with everyone interested in media. Good lookin Chris, you got props in Harlem!

Ian

This is a fantastic book. I've also enjoyed Wired while under your tenure . I just went through many an old issue and reread some excelent articles . There's a post about the "Top Ten Best Software Articles in Wired History at http://maximum-access.blogspot.com/2006/10/top-ten-wired-software-stories-of-all.html
any one interested in Wired and software development should check it out.

Irene Grumman

Another aspect of abundance and scarcity thinking: The newest Nobel Peace Prize winner is an economy professor in Bangladesh, who in 1977 started lending tiny amounts, mostly less than one dollar, to individuals in his flood-devastated country. Five cents to buy ten bananas to sell for twenty cents, that sort of scale, evolved into self-support for millions of people, whose children now attend school. The non-profit bank has assets of billions of dollars, mostly the savings of its participants. How's that for bottom-up, grass-roots democratic phenomena?

Armin

So Amazon offers 57 colours of blenders whereas Walmart only offers 3?

I don't really buy that comparison/argument.

Walmart (or other stores for that matter) also offer or at least could offer 57 colours. Only not in the store for me to take home immediately. They would have to order it from a central warehouse and I would receive it 1, 2 or more days later, which essentially is what Amazon does. I order something from a central warehouse and depending on availability and speed of distribution service I receive it 1, 2 or more days later.

As a customer who wants a mauve/lime green/pink/delete as appropriate blender the end result is the same. What I want I get after 1, 2 or more days.

Your model will work for "virtual goods", but for "physical goods" I don't really see such a huge difference to what we have today. There is no real abundance of these goods and I very much doubt there ever will be. Sure, just in time and on demand manufacturing will have a certain impact here and successful companies will have to utilise these techniques to increase choice, but I feel the changes won't be nearly as big as for "virtual goods".

Apart from all this, what happened to the "Paradox of Choice"? Is that really already resolved?

Paul Bambury

This is not a new idea. The economics of abundance are tribal in origin and probably had their canonical expression in Marxist political economics. More recently (1998), I wrote in A Taxonomy of Internet Commerce (http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_10/bambury/index.html)

"Unlike the real-world the native economy of the Internet is not based on scarcity but on abundance."

and

"Information - the predominant property or commodity - is abundant and largely free. So the native Internet economy is based not on scarcity but on abundance, this is the primary difference between the Internet economy and the real-world."

At this time I was influenced by other work in a similar vein, including, the following texts

http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue3_3/raymond/
http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_3/ghosh/index.html

Even more recently, in Reflections on A Taxonomy of Internet Commerce (http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/special11_7/bambury/index.html), I wrote

"When writing A Taxonomy of Internet Commerce, I was interested in whether a new type of business was emerging on the net and if a new type of economics could describe it. This was partly related to notions about information and freedom. Information was free and abundant on the net. This seemed contrary to economic principles around the relationship between value and scarcity. Since then, there has been abundant work done by many thinkers on these issues.

In respect to the role of abundance and scarcity on the net, Umair Haque and the Bubblegeneration crew (see http://www.bubblegeneration.com) have identified that attention is scarce on the net and that this is an intrinsic feature of net markets. Attention scarcity appears to be an emergent property of vast, distributed networks, the scale of which exceeds the attention span and capacity of any individual, by several orders of magnitude.

My experience in attempting to market music on the net suggests that attention scarcity is an important factor and a difficult problem to address. My music company, Qualia Recordings, has music available for download (for free and pay) on the QualiaRecordings website, on forty-eight other commercial sites through the CDBaby Digital Distribution Program, and available for play on last.fm. Of course, many other artists and independent record companies are also taking advantage of this emerging commercial infrastructure. In this market it can be difficult to attract sufficient attention to sustain the business model."

I now suspect that that Economics of Scarcity are hard-wired in human behaviour. Scarcity appears to be mutable and fungible, it will always exist in some form, as long as humans strive and compete against each other. Notwithstanding this, there is much of value in the Economics of Abundance and maybe a future society will be based on this, but we will need to really solve the problem of scarcity, by providing everyone on the planet with the basics for a decent and productive life, before we can aspire to the Economics of Abundance.

Mr  lv

Mr.Chris:
I have an important thing to talk with you!
I have read your new book--the Long Tail,and I'm also doing researching in internet field in People's Republic of China.However,it is difficult for Chinese to read ,because it is writted by English.So I'm very interesting to be authorized to publish it in the People's Republic of China.
I am a professor,subdecanal of management college in CAS,Chinese Academy of
Sciencer,and I have studied internet economics fou several years.
Because of the lack of your E-mail,If you are interesting in my request,please contact with me.My E-mail is [email protected]!
Best wishes!
Mr.Lv
2006.10.26

kamn@berkeley.edu

Media is not just media. Agreed.

Mr  lv

Mr.Chris:
I have an important thing to talk with you!
I have read your new book--the Long Tail,and I'm also doing researching in internet field in People's Republic of China.However,it is difficult for Chinese to read ,because it is writted by English.So I'm very interesting to be authorized to publish it in the People's Republic of China.
I am a professor,subdecanal of management college in CAS,Chinese Academy of Sciencer,and I have studied internet economics fou several years.
Because of the lack of your E-mail,If you are interesting in my request,please contact with me.My E-mail is [email protected]!
Best wishes!
Mr.Lv
2006.11.1

Emily Curtis

I'm really glad to hear that you're going to focus on the "economics of abundance" theory from your book - it was one of the ideas that struck the sharpest chord with me as I was reading. I had a brainstorming session with a friend of mine over the theory - we tried to imagine what it would really mean to see the well-accepted scarcity principle turned on its ear, what would happen with democratized methods of production and distribution, and we ended our discussion with both of our mouths agape at the potential impact. We took each industry we could think of, even industries that deal in atoms more than bits and bytes, and the impact extends even there...

My mind is still full of ideas - such a world is an entrepreneur's dream come true! I am keen to know more of your perspective on the topic. You also mentioned presentations - is there a place on your site where you put your schedule? Sorry if I've missed the obvious there...

Anyway, I really appreciated the book. Carry on!

Emily

Gray

Don't do one thing but do it all, are you saying you would do something bad?

Andrew Feldstein

I have been sharing some of the ideas in your book with my marketing class. It really helps to give a current and relevant perspective. I wanted to download your poptech PPT but the download stops at 3.6 of the 4.4 MB. Tried on more than one OS. Can you help.
Andrew

Andrew Feldstein

I have been sharing some of the ideas in your book with my marketing class. It really helps to give a current and relevant perspective. I wanted to download your poptech PPT but the download stops at 3.6 of the 4.4 MB. Tried on more than one OS. Can you help.
Andrew

Steven Burda, MBA

Very good read, thank you!

Steven Burda, MBA
www.linkedin.com/in/burda

wowgold

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WOW

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Donald

I visited a very interesting site, they have a vast collection of books which have been categories and are presented to viewers in an easy-to-search format. You should check it out.

http://www.khichdee.com/category-catid-11-paraid-0.htm

Merredith

Really enjoying this whole discussion -- and the content that it describes for that matter. Just a technical suggestion -- if you want to post a PowerPoint presentation with animation, use ThinkFree Online, not ZoHo. ThinkFree seems to be able to keep all the MSFT-like features without losing data, better than ZoHo. Give it a try anyway. ThinkFree also lets you blog from w/in Word, too, without losing data.

http://www.nurceyizevtekstili.com

Good point for start on Social Media its launch real conversations inside the orgnizations.
http://www.nurceyizevtekstili.com

Freddie Sirmans

Just browsing the internet, your blog is very, very interesting.

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Tidbits

The Long Tail by Chris Anderson

Notes and sources for the book

FREE was available in all digital forms--ebook, web book, and audiobook--for free shortly after the hardcover was published on July 7th. The ebook and web book were free for a limited time and limited to certain geographic regions as determined by each national publisher; the unabridged MP3 audiobook (get zip file here) will remain free forever, available in all regions.

Order the hardcover now!